Celebrating our 6 Year Anniversary

The Utah Diaper Bank, which opened its doors in March of 2013, is celebrating six years of helping Utah families in need of diapers. We have grown from distributing 15,000 diapers in our first year to shipping 320,000 diapers in 2018. We now distribute an average of 35,000 diapers a month.

A New Location for Volunteers

Thanks to an infrastructure grant from the National Diaper Bank Network, we have an operations office in Sandy. Earlier this year we received a donation of warehouse space from WEBB Production, which allowed us to resume shipments at a higher level. With these new spaces, we are able to continue increasing our local partners and expand our shipments to other locations in Utah.

 

A New Diaper Bank

A new diaper bank recently opened in Oakley, UT. They will be distributing diapers to non-profit organizations in Summit, Wasatch and Morgan counties. If you would like to donate diapers or volunteer at this location, email Oakley@utahdiaperbank.org

Media

Good 4 Utah Interview: We need More Space

Public Service Announcements


 

Why Do We Need Diapers?

Safety-net programs such as the Food Stamp Program and WIC (Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children) do not cover the cost of diapers. An adequate supply of diapers can cost over $100 per month.

Most licensed day care centers do not accept cloth diapers, and require parents and caregivers to provide a steady supply of disposable diapers. Low-income parents cannot take advantage of free or subsidized childcare if they cannot afford to leave disposable diapers at childcare centers. If parents cannot access daycare, then they are less able to attend work or school on a consistent basis. This leads to increased economic instability and a continuation of the cycle of poverty.    

Without transportation, buying diapers at an inner city convenience store rather than a large retailer can double or triple the monthly cost for diapers. Many parents are already struggling to pay for rent and food and simply cannot afford the high cost of an adequate supply of diapers for their children. In poor and low-income families, a baby can spend a day or longer in one diaper, leading to potential health and abuse risks. Cloth diapering is also not generally a viable option. Most people living in poverty do not have affordable access to washing facilities. Coin-operated laundromats do not allow customers to wash cloth diapers for health and sanitary reasons.



Why Do We Need Diapers?

  

Safety-net programs such as the Food Stamp Program and WIC (Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children) do not cover the cost of diapers. An adequate supply of diapers can cost over $100 per month.

   

The vast majority of licensed day care centers do not accept cloth diapers, and require parents and caregivers to provide a steady supply of disposable diapers. Most people living in poverty do not have affordable access to washing facilities. Furthermore, most coin-operated laundromats do not allow customers to wash cloth diapers for health and sanitary reasons.

    

In poor and low-income families, a baby can spend a day or longer in one diaper, leading to potential health and abuse risks.

    

Low-income parents cannot take advantage of free or subsidized childcare if they cannot afford to leave disposable diapers at childcare centers. If parents cannot access daycare, then they are less able to attend work or school on a consistent basis. This in turn leads to increased economic instability and a continuation of the cycle of poverty.

   

Without transportation, buying diapers at an inner city convenience store rather than a large retailer can double or triple the monthly cost for diapers. Many parents are already struggling to pay for rent and food and simply cannot afford the high cost of an adequate supply of diapers for their children.

   

In communities throughout the country, civic groups, churches, businesses and concerned citizens organize diapers drives to collect diapers for donation to local diaper banks. Diaper drives are a great way to engage your family, friends, neighbors and co-workers in the fight against diaper need. They are also an important tool for educating your community about diaper need and helping give voice to this silent crisis.