About Us


We are a small group of unpaid volunteers working to bring clean fresh diapers to babies in need. 


Mr. Vic Velevis is the founder and Executive Director of the Utah Diaper Bank, located in Salt Lake City, Utah. Click HERE to watch a short 5 minute interview with Mr. Velevis that aired on the Chanel 5, KUTV, Nightly News. (http://www.good4utah.com/good-things-utah/gtu-featured-guest/how-you-can-help-the-rising-diaper-need)


If you would like to donate please drop off diapers at one of our collection points. If you would like to volunteer please contact us at volunteer@utahdiaperbank.org . Better still, organize a diaper drive! We'll loan you banners, collection bins, signage, and we'll come pick up all diapers and distribute them throughout the community. Please take a look at our "Volunteer" and "How To" pages which contain instructions and downloadable documents that can help your very own "Diaper Drive".

So, What's a Diaper Drive?


In communities throughout the country, civic groups, churches, businesses and concerned citizens organize diapers drives to collect diapers for donation to local diaper banks. Diaper drives are a great way to engage your family, friends, neighbors and co-workers in the fight against diaper need. They are also an important tool for educating your community about diaper need and helping give voice to this silent crisis.


Why Do We Need Diapers?

  

Safety-net programs such as the Food Stamp Program and WIC (Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children) do not cover the cost of diapers. An adequate supply of diapers can cost over $100 per month.

   

The vast majority of licensed day care centers do not accept cloth diapers, and require parents and caregivers to provide a steady supply of disposable diapers. Most people living in poverty do not have affordable access to washing facilities. Furthermore, most coin-operated laundromats do not allow customers to wash cloth diapers for health and sanitary reasons.

    

In poor and low-income families, a baby can spend a day or longer in one diaper, leading to potential health and abuse risks.

    

Low-income parents cannot take advantage of free or subsidized childcare if they cannot afford to leave disposable diapers at childcare centers. If parents cannot access daycare, then they are less able to attend work or school on a consistent basis. This in turn leads to increased economic instability and a continuation of the cycle of poverty.

   

Without transportation, buying diapers at an inner city convenience store rather than a large retailer can double or triple the monthly cost for diapers. Many parents are already struggling to pay for rent and food and simply cannot afford the high cost of an adequate supply of diapers for their children.

   

In communities throughout the country, civic groups, churches, businesses and concerned citizens organize diapers drives to collect diapers for donation to local diaper banks. Diaper drives are a great way to engage your family, friends, neighbors and co-workers in the fight against diaper need. They are also an important tool for educating your community about diaper need and helping give voice to this silent crisis.